Applied Science

BTEC Level 3 Diploma (2 A Level Equivalent) or Extended Certificate (1 A Level Equivalent)

Level 3 Applied Science opens the door for you to access a broad range of science related careers. This qualification will allow you to progress into many science related degree subjects at university, such as nursing, midwifery, biomedical sciences, physiotherapy, radiology and many others. If you are interested in science but find the emphasis on assessment by examinations does not allow you to show your full potential than this course could be for you.

The Applied Science course will allow you to study how science is applied in many different types of professions and industries. The focus of the course is scientific usage, concentrating on how scientists and others use science in their work.

A combination of coursework and external exams

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ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

The BTEC Extended Certificate in Applied Science requires you to achieve at least the minimum entry requirements for your chosen pathway plus a grade 5 or higher in GCSE Maths and a grade 5 or higher in GCSE Science.

The BTEC Diploma in Applied Science requires you to achieve at least the minimum entry requirements for your chosen pathways plus a grade 4 or higher in GCSE Maths and a grade 4 or higher in GCSE Sciences.

EXAM BOARD

Pearson EDEXCEL

COURSE STRUCTURE

Your teaching will take place in a specialist laboratory that is equipped to the highest standards. In addition, there are dedicated computer rooms for you to complete coursework and an open access computer area adjacent to the laboratories.

EXTENDED CERTIFICATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE (1 A LEVEL EQUIVALENT)
You will study 4 units in total, 2 of which are assignment based and internally assessed and 2 are externally assessed. All units allow for you to submit resubmission or take resits.

UNIT 1: PRINCIPLES AND APPLICATIONS OF SCIENCE

Scientists and technicians working in science-related organisations must have a good understanding of core science concepts. A strong grasp of these concepts will enable you to use and apply this knowledge and understanding in vocational contexts when studying other units within this specification. (Externally assessed examination.)

UNIT 2: PRACTICAL SCIENTIFIC PROCEDURES AND TECHNIQUES
Through the practical tasks in the unit, you will develop proficiency in the quantitative analytical techniques of titration, colorimetry and calorimetry, including learning to calculate the concentration of solutions. You will use measurement of temperature to study cooling curves and be introduced to paper and thin-layer chromatography (TLC). You will also have the opportunity to calibrate equipment and will be encouraged to be aware of the safety aspects of given laboratory procedures and techniques. (Internally assessed assignments.)

UNIT 3: SCIENCE INVESTIGATION SKILLS
In this unit, you will develop the essential skills underpinning practical scientific investigations. As well as drawing on Unit 1 and Unit 2, these skills will be delivered through subject themes ranging from enzymes and diffusion to electrical circuits. The subject themes provide different contexts for the development of the investigative skills. To complete the assessment task within this unit, you will need to draw on your learning from across your programme. Science investigative skills will help you in many scientific or enquiry-based learning courses in higher education, as well as prepare you for employment in a science-related industry.

UNIT 8: PHYSIOLOGY OF HUMAN BODY SYSTEMS
In this unit, you will focus on three body systems: musculoskeletal, lymphatic and digestive. You will examine each of the systems as a functioning unit, identifying their structure and function. By exploring the anatomy of these systems, through experimentation and use of simulations, you will develop your knowledge and understanding of their role in the human body. You will also give attention to understanding the implications of what happens when the systems fail to work properly and the available treatments. The unit will be of particular interest if you are interested in sport, body-building and maintaining a healthy body. An understanding of the fundamental systems that make up the human body is a key requirement if you wish to progress to study health and care-related programmes or biomedical sciences in further education and at university. It is an essential requirement for a career in sport- and health-related disciplines, for example physiotherapist, sport trainer and exercise physiologist.

ASSESSMENT
Internal Assessment (50%)
External Assessment (50%)

DIPLOMA IN APPLIED SCIENCE (2 A LEVEL EQUIVALENT)
You will study 8 units in total. Units include those on the Extended Certificate (listed above) plus;

UNIT 4: LABORATORY TECHNIQUES AND THEIR APPLICATION
In this unit, you will investigate a scientific organisation to gain an understanding of how it operates. You will investigate health and safety practices in the organisation’s laboratories and consider related primary and secondary legislation. You will also have the opportunity to compare the approach taken to hazards and risk management in different part of the organisation, for example production, the warehouse, the office. It is important to realise that whether you progress to employment in the science industry or to higher education in science, you will have to be aware of the relevant hazards and to follow the practices that have been developed for your safety.

UNIT 5: PRINCIPLES AND APPLICATIONS OF SCIENCE
This unit builds on and extends the range of key science concepts that you covered in Unit 1: Principles and Applications of Science I. A strong grasp of these concepts will enable you to use and apply this knowledge and understanding in vocational contexts when studying other units in this specification. This unit includes: properties, uses and production of some inorganic compounds; structures, reactions and properties of commercially important organic compounds; enthalpy changes; the cardiovascular system; ventilation and gas exchange in the lungs; urinary system structure and function; cell transport mechanisms; thermal physics; physical properties of materials; and fluids in motion.

UNIT 6: INVESTIGATIVE PROJECT
In this unit, you will carry out an investigative project that you have chosen in collaboration with your teacher. You will choose one topic area that interests you and this will form the basis of your investigative project. You will carry out a scientific literature search and review, considering the project’s aims and objectives, then produce a realistic plan and carry out the project safely using your scientific investigation skills, project management skills and what you have learnt from the other units. Finally, you will prepare an evaluative report that will consider the project outcomes and suggest amendments that may have improved those outcomes.

UNIT 23: FORENSIC EVIDENCE COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES
In this unit, you will develop an understanding of the importance of health and safety, and the need for objectivity and justification in your approach to the identification, collection and analysis of forensic evidence. You will take part in a simulated crime scene investigation and be expected to demonstrate appropriate forensic techniques to process the scene, collecting biological, chemical and physical evidence. You will be required to document and package all evidence to provide a chain of continuity. This unit outlines the practical approach to forensic investigation, allowing you to develop appropriate knowledge and skills. You will explore a variety of evidentiary principles, from collecting the evidence, through the analysis and, finally, to the presentation of your results in a variety of formats for use in the criminal justice system (CJS).

ASSESSMENT

Internal Assessment (62.5%)
External Assessment (37.5%)

TRIPS AND ENICHMENT

As part of this course, you will be offered several offsite visits. A recent example includes a trip to Atom pub in Beverley where our students got the opportunity to experience the role of crime scene investigation at a mocked-up incident. Wearing hazmat suits, latex gloves, visors and face-coverings, students spent the morning collecting trace evidence and recording findings. This included samples of hair and blood as well as gathering photographic evidence of footprints and fingerprint data. All their findings were then brought back to the College laboratories to analyse and identify the suspect.

You will also have the opportunity to listen to a variety of guest speakers related to your learning. The department has strong links with The University of Hull and often used their specialist facilities to extend lab work. Lunchtime support sessions run throughout the year so that you can further develop exam technique or assignment portfolio.

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