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College Trips

Washington DC 2022

The DC Experience

By | College Trips, Course News, Government & Politics, History, News, Sociology

Wyke students are back on their global tours – “The Wyke Experience”.

The cross-college visit to Washington DC was Wyke’s first international trip since the lifting of Covid restrictions. Scheduling the tour in early spring meant that the group were able to enjoy the iconic cherry blossom in full bloom through the spring sunshine.

Over the six-day break, the group visited all the key monuments, historical sites and political institutions. The Lincoln Memorial and the Martin Luther King Memorial, the White House, the Smithsonian Museums, Arlington Cemetery and Capitol Hill, were all visited in a packed itinerary. The visit to the National Museum of African American History and Culture was particularly significant as entry is limited to pre-booked tickets due to the centres level of popularity.

The entire trip linked into the A level syllabuses, a point that was constantly referenced throughout the tour. James Goodchild, Head of A level History teacher and A level Government & Politics, delivered mini lectures at all the key landmarks. Catherine Eariss, Head of A Level Sociology teacher, also drew connections to the social changes that the USA experienced during the 20th century. For example, the visit to the Martin Luther King memorial linked to the “Beliefs in Society” topic and how religion has impacted on social change.

It wasn’t all museum, landmark and statues. To sample some “real” American culture, the group booked to watch the Washington Capitals National League Ice hockey game. The following day, some of students went to see the Washington’s Nationals baseball match at the stadium adjacent to the group’s hotel.  Outside of the political and cultural centre, the group explored Washington’s suburbs, visiting the city’s zoological gardens. During the week, there was even time for shopping at the enormous Pentagon Mall.

“Washington DC 2022” was an amazing visit. New students get ready for “The Wyke Experience” – planning is already underway for 2023.

 

 

Aspiring Lawyers

By | College Trips, Law

Recently four of our Law Society students participated in the Inaugural Sixth Form Mock Trial Competition, hosted by the University of Hull Law School.

Luke, Eleanor, El and Narcisa took the roles of senior and junior respondents during the moot, dealing with a criminal appeal case in the brand new court room at the university.

It was noted by the Dean of the University how well the students had conducted themselves throughout the day and expressed the standard of the moot was very high. A special mention was given to Eleanor Spratt for her confident and convincing presentation to the court.

Teacher of Law Faye Sims said: “The students did remarkably well in their first experience of mooting. Their organisation and commitment to the preparations for the moot was very impressive, the presentation of their legal arguments demonstrated fantastic legal understanding and creativity and their delivery of their moot points to the mock court room was exceptional. It was very positive experience for our budding lawyers, the skills from this day will almost certainly be the start of very successful legal careers for our students.”

A huge congratulations to all those involved.

DoE 2021

Truly Determined and Stoical

By | Classics, College Trips, Community, News, News for Parents, On Campus, Student Association

Qualifying Expedition for the Gold Duke of Edinburgh Award

“Very proud of these young people… what they’ve done these past four days is truly determined and stoical, a great achievement after this crazy COVID time. Well done all of you!” The words of the accredited assessor perfectly summed up the successes of our fantastic fourteen students who had just completed their Gold expedition for their Duke of Edinburgh award. The look on their faces when the assessor told them they were members of this exquisite Gold club was priceless; so well deserved!

“I’ve gained so much confidence doing Duke of Edinburgh,” said one of our students with heartfelt emotion, thus highlighting one of the many reasons that students participate in this prestigious award. “Duke of Edinburgh makes you a more rounded person,” the assessor expressed, then added, “When my husband used to interview people, if they had D of E on their application, then it gave them something to talk about.”

One of the teams named themselves after Bob, who was a gorgeous little teddy bear with a dark brown fur coat acting as their mascot and being integral to the team’s aim. All teams need an aim. Bob was seen everywhere, being strapped to the belt of the student; on top of mountains, on trails upholding a laminated copy of the countryside code, helping a team member recover after an unfortunate fall into a muddy bog and being a much-valued member of the group. Team spirit was evident throughout.

For four days, walking just over forty miles and camping for three nights, our adventurous students had pitted their skills and cleverness against the bracing October cold and dampness; using their wits to solve navigational challenges on the bleak splendour of the stunning North York Moors that were donning their autumnal attire – golden leaves echoing the Gold award!

What an amazing accomplishment in such challenging circumstances! Our remarkable students worked hard for their Gold and truly deserved their success.

So, come and develop your skills and wits and earn your Gold! Contact Sarah.Thackray@wyke.ac.uk (manager of Duke of Edinburgh award) or office@wyke.ac.uk for more information.

Navigating North Yorkshire

By | College Trips, News

“Ten of the Duke of Edinburgh Gold Award students participated in a ten mile practice walk over the weekend.

This took place in the pretty North York Moors with the sunshine raining down and highlighting the beauty of the area. We are so lucky to have this area so close to the college where our students can safely practice their skills of navigation, which are needed for both their practice and qualifying expeditions. Teamwork is one of the mainstays of the Duke of Edinburgh award and these walks allow students the opportunity to get to know each other and form friendships.

Lunch was taken at the top of a hill, which commanded spectacular views around the full three hundred and sixty degrees of the vista. Breaking for lunch allowed our students the chance to talk and take stock of their walk, discussing how they might adapt their kit and techniques for their expeditions.

The final, most welcome, bonus was to arrive at the lay-by where we had parked the minibus and found an ice cream van! On such a hot and sunny day, this was a fitting end.”

David Pickering

Duke of Edinburgh Wolds Walk

Walking in the Wolds

By | College Trips, News

“On Sunday, 24 first year students took part in their first Duke of Edinburgh Gold Award practice walk. This began in the pretty village of Bishop Wilton on the Yorkshire Wolds and took in the equally pretty village of Millington in a circular route.

When we began the walk, the autumnal colours were shining in the low, golden light of the Sun. The weather was settled, albeit in the later afternoon some dull cloud had come in with a light but chilly north easterly breeze. Taking lunch on top of the hill overlooking the beautiful Millington valley was bracing and we didn’t linger long.

There were several purposes for the walk. Students and staff were able to assess their fitness and ability in challenging terrain. In previous years, the value of these walks has been proven when things like ill-fitting boots or medical conditions have become obvious and we have been able to adjust accordingly so that students are successful in the Duke of Edinburgh Gold Award.

Navigation was practised. This is a crucial skill that the students must know when they will be completing their practice and qualifying expeditions. The best way to practise navigation is by doing it… and then getting it wrong in a safe environment!

So, it was to my surprise that my small group of four, who were in front of me, managed at one point to turn left when it was clearly shown on the map that they should turn right and they were looking at a signpost which pointed to the right! How did they miss that? It would take them about a kilometre of extra walking to realise that they were wrong. However, this was an excellent learning experience because they were able to tell me their error, and it was done in a safe environment. As one of them said to me, “We had got too complacent and thought we were better than we were!” We never stop learning!”

As I write, we have further practice walks and activities planned throughout the year and we are looking forward to doing them, with appropriate adjustments for the current situation.”

David Pickering

Learning Languages

By | College Trips, Course News, French, German, Spanish

Here at Wyke, we really believe in the value of learning a second language. Not only does it offer up a wide range of opportunities both for further study and employment, it is a great way to connect with people from all over the world.

With the A Level exam season fast approaching, on Wednesday 4th March Wyke teamed up with the language departments at the University of Hull, to give our second year language students the opportunity to practice their speaking abilities.

French tutor Nicki Johnstone said: “I organised the day to get students to practise the stimulus card task for the speaking exam in a testing situation. They were speaking to people they don’t know, so they were really out of their comfort zone.

“It is great for them to get feedback from uni staff and students who pick out different aspects of their language to work on and often give their own insight into the topics we have studied.”

31 students from all three Modern Foreign Language courses (French, German and Spanish) took part in ‘speed dating’ sessions. Wyke students were partnered up with a member of staff or a student and tested on various subjects, ranging from culture to healthcare.

Our learners were given lots of helpful feedback and insightful advice about honing their language skills in preparation for their upcoming A Level exams.

Students Olivia Laurie and Eugenie Bweziye said: “The event gave me a lot more confidence in my fluency, and all the teachers and staff were really friendly. It was very informative and they made us feel comfortable about speaking. The feedback was useful about grammar in particular”

We’d like to say a huge thank you to French teacher Nicki Johnstone for organising such an enriching and informative day.

We’d also like to say a massive thank you all staff and students from the University of Hull for their time and expertise.

Business Team GB

On your Markets, Get Set, Go!

By | Business, College Trips, Course News, News

Recently our A Level Business students were invited to the University of Hull to test their marketing skills against other sixth forms in the region.

Following the universities exclusive partnership with Team GB, the project set by the university tested our students knowledge of marketing and how to sustain engagement before, during and after the upcoming Olympic Games in Tokyo.

Our students wowed the judges with their presentation skills and ideas, placing 2nd out of all of the sixth forms invited and winning some great Team GB goodies for their hard work, well done!

sociology students in london

Sociology goes to London

By | College Trips, Course News, News, Sociology

Last week, Wyke’s Sociology students departed for a two day visit to London as part of their course enrichment. The visit saw students partake in a variety of activities in order to enhance their learning and understanding of the social world.

Day one

Day one began with a visit to the Old Operating Theatre for a walking tour on Booth, poverty and housing reform. Students then participated in a talk on contemporary attitudes towards health, illness and the body, enabling them to go beyond the specification in exploring the Sociology of Health, by enabling synoptic links to the topic.

During a period of free time, students were given the opportunity to explore Leicester Square, taking the chance to grab a bite to eat and visit shops such as the Lego Store and M&Ms World.

In the evening, the group travelled to the West End to see the show ‘Everybody’s Talking About Jamie’, a musical which explores themes of sexuality and gender formation within society. Students were lucky enough to meet the leading man, Noah Thomas, at the stage door and had their photographs taken with him, as well as receiving his autograph.

 

Day two

The second day of the visit began with the group being given some free time to explore Covent Garden, taking in the shopping experience as well as the sights and sounds of the capital. A group of students even discovered an air pollution campaign, which enabled them to draw connections to their Green Crime studies.

The visit ended with students attending the A-level Sociology Conference at the University College London Institute of Education. Speakers included Professor Louise Archer, Professor Becky Francis and the renowned professor, Paul Gilroy, all of whom are covered in the Sociology of Education module on the course.

 

A huge thank you to Catherine Eariss for organising such an informative and enriching visit.

iceland 2019

Land of Ice and Fire

By | Biology, College Trips, Course News, Geography, Mathematics

The visit to Iceland was undertaken by the Geography Department in March.  Cyril Clark and Kerry Thompson took 24 geographers to the island of ‘ice and fire’ to study landforms and processes associated with constructive plate boundaries and glaciation.

The trip was highly successful partly because of the exciting itinerary but mainly because of the fantastic group of students that took a great deal of interest in the geographical landscape.

It was an early start on the first day.  All students were up and ready in the hotel reception at

4.45am ready to check in at the airport.   All students were wearing their bright red Wyke hoodies and followed all instructions in a military fashion to ensure swift clearance of luggage check and customs.  By 11am we were in a very cold snowy Iceland.

Our tour guide, Steffan (also a professional opera singer and huge fan of Wyke students), took us to our first destination, Gunnuhver, where we could walk among mud pools and steam vents generated from the geothermal reservoir beneath the rift valley.  We then drove past lava fields and crater rows to the Bridge between Continents, spanning a fissure acknowledged to be the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, which runs through Iceland.  Crossing this symbolic bridge, we witnessed the effects of continental drift.

Our next stop was Stampar Craters where we could walk among pahoehoe and aa lavas that formed 800 years ago in eruptions known as the “Reykjanes Fires”.  These were fissure eruptions along a 4km fault which created the spatter cones called the Stampar crater row.  These lava fields are in an active rift zone which is prone to frequent but very small earthquakes.

We then visited Reykjanesviti, Iceland’s oldest lighthouse and Mt. Valahnúkur, composed of tuff layers, pillow lava and breccia.  The mountain was formed in a single eruption and shows evidence of the different phases of the eruption.   A drive along the coast allowed us to observe relic cliffs formed from the isostatic uplift following the end of the last glaciation.

The highlight of the day was dressing in hard hats and crampons to tunnel underground in a hollowed out lava tube.

We stayed at Snotra Hostel in the foothills of Eyjafjallajökull, where Cyril instructed the students on completion of their fieldwork booklet.

The second day was equally impressive.  We started by visiting SKogafoss a wide, thundering curtain of water 60m high and then made our way to Solheimajokull to trek on its frozen glacial snout careful to avoid the deep crevasses.  Our experienced glacier guide taught us how to use basic ice equipment, crampons and ice axes.

After lunch, we visited Reynishverfi where we could walk along the black volcanic beach to see magnificent basalt cliffs and caves.  Then to Dyrhólaey – the name means ‘door hill island’ – with its 120m high natural rock arch, this prominent headland is likely to have been formed in a submarine eruption similar to that of Surtsey Island in 1963.

After visiting another spectacular waterfall, it was back to the hostel for more fieldwork tasks and quiz night.  After the quiz we went to seek the Northern Lights with high hopes from the promising forecast – unfortunately none were to be seen.

The last day was the highlight for some students (me) as we were able to relax in the hot waters of the Secret Lagoon. With the steam rising into the air, the place has a magical feeling.  The water stays at 38-40 Celsius all year round and is perfect for bathing.  We soon cooled off during our next stop at Gullfoss.  These double falls drop around 33m then plunge into a mile-long gorge – one of the coldest moments of my life!

We then went to visit the site of Geysir, a spouting hot spring that gave its name to all the world’s geysers. Although it doesn’t often spout nowadays, its neighbour ‘Strokkur’ erupts every 10-15 minutes reaching a height of around 30m.   We then had a quick stop at Efstidalur dairy farm so that everyone could enjoy an ice-cream whilst standing in a blizzard.

We really appreciated the warmth of the coach as it took us to our last stop frequently used in The Game of Thrones for cold locations.  This National Park is where Iceland’s parliament was established in 930AD. The site straddles the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, its rift valley forming where the Eurasian and North American tectonic plates pull apart at an average of 3cm a year.

The last night was spent in Reykjavik, where we came face to face with the storm that was to cause havoc in the UK the next day.  A windy walk to the Hard Rock Café for tea and then bed after an exciting and exhausting three days of spectacular geography.

This was an amazing trip and one the students will never forget.

Washington DC Tour 2019

By | College Trips, Course News, Economics, Government & Politics, History, News, Sociology

Visiting Washington DC in the spring-time was a trip to remember. This year the Wyke cross-college trip was scheduled later in the year, the weather was mild and the iconic cherry blossom trees were in full bloom, as twenty five politics and history students toured Washington DC.

Over the six day break, the group visited all the key monuments, historical sites, educational establishments and political institutions. The Lincoln Memorial and the Martin Luther King Memorial, the White House, Georgetown University, the Smithsonian Museums, Arlington Cemetery and Capitol Hill, were all visited in a packed itinerary. The visit to the Capitol Building was especially rewarding as the Senate was in-session, giving the students the opportunity to observe American politics in action.

The entire trip linked into the A level syllabus, a point that was constantly referenced throughout the tour. James Goodchild, A Level History teacher and John Whitaker, A Level Government & Politics teacher, took it in turns to deliver mini-lectures at all the landmarks. Catherine Eariss, A Level Sociology teacher, also drew connections to the social changes that the USA experienced during the 20th century.

It wasn’t all museum, landmark and statue. Following the success of last year, the group booked in to watch the Washington Wizards basketball game and others went to see an intense baseball match at the newly renovated National’s Park stadium. Add to this there was even time for shopping at the enormous Pentagon Mall.

To see more of Washington DC 2019, search Wyke Washington DC on Instagram or visit the Wyke Flickr account to download and keep.

Planning is already underway for 2020.